Thursday, March 1, 2018

Armed in America by Patrick J. Charles

Armed in America: A History of Gun Rights from Colonial Militias to Concealed Carry

Patrick J. Charles

This accessible legal history describes how the Second Amendment has been interpreted throughout most of American history and shows that today's gun-rights advocates have drastically departed from the long-held interpretation of the constitutional right to bear arms. This illuminating study traces the transformation of the right to arms from its inception in English and colonial American law to today's impassioned gun-control debate. As historian and legal scholar Patrick J. Charles shows, what the right to arms means to Americans, as well as what it legally protects, has changed drastically since its first appearance in the 1689 Declaration of Rights. Armed in America explores how and why the right to arms transformed at different points in history. The right was initially meant to serve as a parliamentary right of resistance, yet by the ratification of the Second Amendment in 1791 the right had become indispensably intertwined with civic republicanism. As the United States progressed into the 19th century the right continued to change—this time away from civic republicanism and towards the individual-right understanding that is known today, albeit with the important caveat that the right could be severely restricted by the government's police power. Throughout the 20th century this understanding of the right remained the predominant view. But working behind the scenes was the beginnings of the gun-rights movement—a movement that was started in the early 20th century through the collective efforts of sporting magazine editors and was eventually commandeered by the National Rifle Association to become the gun-rights movement known today.Readers looking to sort through the shrill rhetoric surrounding the current gun debate and arrive at an informed understanding of the legal and historical development of the right to arms will find this book to be an invaluable resource.

Nonfiction. Call number: 344.73 Cha. View in our catalog

This Idea is Brilliant by John Brockman

This Idea is Brilliant: Lost, Overlooked, and Underappreciated Scientific Concepts Everyone Should Know

John Brockman, editor

Presents essays responding to a question about what scientific term or concept ought to be more widely known, written by such authors as Jared Diamond, Richard Thaler, Richard Dawkins, Lisa Randall, Steven Pinker, and Carlo Roveri.

Nonfiction. Call number: 500 Thi. View in our catalog

The Château by Paul Goldberg

The Château

Paul Goldberg

Facing daunting prospects after losing a prestigious job, a once-successful science reporter investigates the suspicious death of his college roommate, a Miami Beach plastic surgeon, in an all-or-nothing case that is shaped by the schemes of the reporter's political dissident father.

Fiction. Call number: FIC Gol. View in our catalog

Love, Hate & Other Filters by Samira Ahmed

Love, Hate & Other Filters

Samira Ahmed

American-born seventeen-year-old Maya Aziz is torn between worlds. There’s the proper one her parents expect for their good Indian daughter: attending a college close to their suburban Chicago home, and being paired off with an older Muslim boy her mom deems “suitable.” And then there is the world of her dreams: going to film school and living in New York City—and maybe (just maybe) pursuing a boy she’s known from afar since grade school, a boy who’s finally falling into her orbit at school. There’s also the real world, beyond Maya’s control. In the aftermath of a horrific crime perpetrated hundreds of miles away, her life is turned upside down. The community she’s known since birth becomes unrecognizable; neighbors and classmates alike are consumed with fear, bigotry, and hatred. Ultimately, Maya must find the strength within to determine where she truly belongs.

Teen fiction. Call number: YA FIC Ahm. View in our catalog

Betty Before X by Ilyasah Shabazz

Betty Before X

Ilyasah Shabazz and Renée Watson

In Detroit, 1945, eleven-year-old Betty’s house doesn’t quite feel like home. She believes her mother loves her, but she can’t shake the feeling that her mother doesn’t want her. Church helps those worries fade, if only for a little while. The singing, the preaching, the speeches from guest activists like Paul Robeson and Thurgood Marshall stir African Americans in her community to stand up for their rights. Betty quickly finds confidence and purpose in volunteering for the Housewives League, an organization that supports black-owned businesses. Soon, the American civil rights icon we now know as Dr. Betty Shabazz is born. Inspired by Betty's real life—but expanded upon and fictionalized through collaboration with novelist Renée Watson—Ilyasah Shabazz illuminates four poignant years in her mother’s childhood with this book, painting an inspiring portrait of a girl overcoming the challenges of self-acceptance and belonging that will resonate with readers today.

Youth fiction. Call number: J FIC Sha. View in our catalog

Descriptions and images provided by the publishers.

© 2018 William P. Faust Westland Public Library